Review






Review of “Taming the Violence of Faith”

by Dr. Norman H. Imberman

In the 200s B.C. it was Archimedes. In the 1500s-1600s it was Galileo Galilei. In 1665-1666 it was Isaac Newton. In the 1800s it was Michael Faraday, Gregor Mendel and James Clerk Maxwell. In the 1900s it was Albert Einstein and Max Planck. All of these innovators have become household words in the American lexicon. They and many others have contributed a wealth of information to the world that has raised the standard of living for the masses never even imagined before such men existed. Each of them contributed a piece of the puzzle of the mysteries of the universe that added to the integration of the physical and biological sciences. What about the social sciences?

Jay Stuart Snelson, in his book “Taming the Violence of Faith,” has taken the subject of sociology to new heights with a brilliant integration that can solve the problems of society, previously thought of as unsolvable. His use of syllogisms is beyond reproach as he develops, finally, a Science of Social Causality. Snelson answers questions and conflicts that previously had no solution. In Snelson’s treatise, a well-organized history lesson is presented that integrates the failings of the past with his science of the present. He demonstrates the causes and effects of the many wars, riots, thefts, and inhumanities of men towards each other over the past centuries, which continue to this day. You’ll find there is a common denominator behind most of the ills of society.

Historically it has been demonstrated that the more important and significant a new idea, the more it has been overlooked at the time of its innovation. The Snelson Integration must not become just another overlooked theory. The only thing his work can accomplish is to change the world for the better. That’s all. It’s a must reading for atheists and theists, for men and women, for the left and the right, for Jews, Gentiles, and Muslims, for the uneducated and the educated, and especially for you, the reader. Once you read it you will find it difficult not to recommend it to your friends and family with superlative enthusiasm.